To Marry A Tiger

Recently the news reported Tiger Woods’ infidelity concerning his affairs with one or more women.  Usually, I don’t take much interest in the lives of celebrities; who’s dating whom, who’s photographed on a wild bender, or who’s entering or leaving rehab.  These are fodder for the supermarket tabloids, not serious news sources.  However, I believe that affairs are a different matter.  They damage the fundamental building block of society, the family.  Neither the husband nor the wife can come out unscathed as a result of adultery.   Although rarely seen by the naked eye, the deed still leaves grotesque scars.  A sacred trust, as well as a vow to the community and God, is torn asunder in the selfish act.  And, heaven forbid, what becomes of the children as a result?  Do they grow to hate daddy or mommy either openly or secretly for the pain inflicted on the other?  Or does their worldview warp, starting to view adultery as a socially acceptable act?

So what sort of restitution does Tiger Woods offer to his wife in penance?  A public apology and money…lots and lots of money…$60 million to be exact.  When looking at Wood’s marriage you begin to wonder if that was what the marriage was always about.  After all, although the precise numbers are uncertain, they did sign a prenup agreement certain to be worth millions.  Why did Tiger get married in the first place?  Was it solely about money too?  Did he gain new sponsorships as a result of his marriage?  Was that his main goal all along?  Does his guidance come through his conscious or through his lust and his wallet?  It is a sad reflection of our society, or at least an element of our society, when you look at marriage as a strictly financial transaction.  These are not the marriages that last, the marriages that produce well-adjusted children.

At this point you may think that I’m being pretty hard on Tiger Woods here and perhaps I am.  Then again, he’s not alone.  When tying this subject to politics, think back to a recent President or a Governor of South Carolina.  I don’t know if adultery is more common now, but I do know that it is certainly more tolerated.  This toleration must end for our society to survive.  It is a crime with consequences often far greater than theft, fraud, or bribery, but it is rarely treated as such.  Now I’m not saying that we should return to the days of stoning, but there should be a clear, undeniable, and harsh punishment for adultery to show that our society will not accept such perverse and damaging behavior.

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