RPV Adds to God’s Law

I’d wager, whether religious or not, the average American knows at least something about the 10 Commandments, such as they were carved in stone and given to Moses or that they include instructions such as honor thy father and mother or thou shall not commit adultery.  As they are an important foundational basis for Christianity, Judaism, and Islam, one can find monuments and references to them throughout the United States on both public and private property.  In 2007, I even found a plaque listing the commandments on a Taco Bell in eastern Tennessee.

But, apparently, the Republican Party of Virginia has decided to add to these 10 Commandments ordained by God.  On February 4th, RPV Chairman John Whitbeck penned an email where he created the 12th Commandment.  For those who don’t know, many years ago a Republican Party chairman in California wrote the 11th, “thou shall not speak ill of a fellow Republican”.

As Chairman Whitbeck says:

My friends, I am not going to copy the California Chairman and demand the 11th Commandment be followed by our candidates in 2017.  That’s been done before.  Instead, I am going to ask every Republican leader, District chair, unit chair, elected official and grassroots activist to demand our candidates follow the 11th Commandment.  Let them know that personal attacks, false innuendo and below the belt politics have no place in our Party.  If we do that, our nominees will emerge strong and with a united party behind them.  Too often, we fight the primary well into the general election.  We saw multiple examples of this in the last few years.  In some cases we won and in some we lost.  But in 2017 we are more likely to lose if we don’t follow the 11th Commandment.  So I ask each of you to hold our candidates accountable in this regard.

He goes on to add:

What I will do as your Party Chairman is call for an adherence to a 12th Commandment.  It is a solemn duty I believe is incumbent upon all Republicans.  Quite simply, the 12th Commandment should be “thou shalt support the Republican nominee.”

Whitbeck explains his rationale:

The last few years we have seen good Republicans, even members of our local Units, openly support Independent and third party candidates far too often.  While we all appreciate people standing on principal [sic], how is it principled to support someone who has no chance of winning and handing elections over to the Democrats?

Listen to what Mr. Whitbeck is saying here.  At the end of the day, principles don’t matter.  What matters is electing Republicans and defeating Democrats.  Imagine what he might have said if he lived during biblical times.  Sure, you might think that King Ahab and Queen Jezebel are terrible and immoral people who constantly violate God’s law, but if they are Republicans, we must never speak ill of them and we must always support them no matter what they say or do.  Or, yes, as pro-lifers we don’t approve King Herod’s plan to kill all male infants in Bethlehem, but if he came to power under the Republican banner, all Republican activists must not call him out on this.  Would modern day conservative Christians have the courage to denounce these ill-fit leaders or would they stand with Chairman Whitbeck and support Republicans who might stand against every principle they claim to care about simply because “we don’t want the Democrats to win, do we?”

What baffles me is what sort of arrogance and irreverence would compel Chairman Whitbeck to “demand” his 12th Commandment?  Does anyone else see the sacrilege of placing loyalty to the Republican Party of Virginia and her candidates on the same plane as God’s commandments?  Are commandments such as “thou shall not murder” and “thou shall have no other gods before me” equal in importance as “thou shall support the Republicans no matter what” and “thou shall never vote thy conscience”?

Although it may be true that as Chairman Whitbeck says, “If you add the Libertarian candidate’s vote totals to that of our nominees in 2013 and 2014, we would be living out the last year of Governor Cuccinelli’s term and the third year of Senator Gillespie’s,” I know many, good, liberty-minded folks (myself included) who would not have voted for Ed Gillespie in 2014 even if the Libertarian candidate, Robert Sarvis weren’t on the ballot.  Why wouldn’t some Republicans support Ed Gillespie in spite of his being the party nominee?  The answer is simple; he didn’t share their most important values.

I guess this latest affront from the Republican Party of Virginia shouldn’t be surprising given that although they retracted it in the spring of 2016, the RPV posted on Facebook that “Not voting to stop Hillary borders on treason.”  The current party leadership has helped transform the Republican Party of Virginia into an organization that is unconcerned with their creed, liberty, and conservative principles.  Instead, the only two important pillars of the “Republican faith” are winning at all costs and unquestioned loyalty.  As demonstrated in the quoted email, the chairman even dares to elevate himself to a modern day prophet of God by issuing new commandments.  They believe that anyone who holds an opinion that deviates from the GOP (God’s Own Party) and does not prostrate him or herself before their leaders and nominees, must be declared a heretic or a traitor and cast into utter darkness.

I’d like to see some socially conservative group call out John Whitbeck and the RPV for this blasphemous attempt to add to God’s law, but I expect that there will be no outrage and no call to action.  After all, the most important thing at the end of the day is to be a “Republican first”; decency is burdensome and all other principles are secondary to prevent a future Governor Northam or Governor Perriello, right?

Corruption in Frederick County

A photo of a portion of the crowd
A photo of a portion of the crowd

On Tuesday, August 30th, the Frederick County Republican Party gathered for their monthly meeting.  The room was packed with about 100 people, including Delegate Chris Collins (R-29), Delegate Dave LaRock (R-33), former Delegate Mark Berg (R-29) and John Whitbeck, the chairman of the Republican Party of Virginia.  There was also a fellow clad in a Barbara Comstock shirt holding some of her bumper stickers, most likely a campaign staffer. This was the first meeting of the Frederick County GOP since the Republican State Central Committee upheld the decision of the 10th district GOP to expel Mark Berg and nine other members of the Frederick County GOP from the Republican Party and ban them from Republican functions for the next four years, which presumably also stripped Dr. Berg of his chairmanship of the Frederick County GOP.  Given that development, one would assume that this meeting would likely be quite interesting.

Outside the meeting room there were two tables, one for guests to sign in and another for county party members.  There was also a poster which contained a curious message stating that Frederick County was not Russia.

IMG_3171Inside, there were a variety of additional posters including a supposed quote from 10th district GOP Chairwoman Jo Thoburn denouncing due process and the 1st Amendment, and another declaring that Article I of the RPV Party Plan was unconstitutional.

Shortly after 7 PM, a woman (I’m told it was Rose Focht, the vice-chair of the group), declared that the meeting was likely to be very contentious and therefore announced that a neutral party, Bill Card from Prince William County, would serve as chair for the meeting.  However, as far as I observed, her decision was neither voted upon nor ratified by the membership.  After the opening prayer and pledge of allegiance (offered by Delegate LaRock), the meeting got underway.  It was announced that there were 63 members of the Frederick County GOP present along with 34 guests.

Temporary Chair Bill Card with RPV Chairman John Whitbeck
Temporary Chair Bill Card with RPV Chairman John Whitbeck before the start of the meeting

The chair then declared that the group would vote on a slate of new members to the committee.  There were some murmurs from the crowd that the chair had changed the order of the agenda of the meeting as the addition of new members was supposed to be scheduled for the end of the meeting.  In addition, no one presented a list of these possible members either in writing or verbally.  One member objected, declaring that she wanted to know more about these potential new additions, but the chair ruled her out of order.  Then, one of the applicant new members agreed that they should be introduced, but he was ignored by the chair.  In the voice vote that followed to add these new members, it sounded to me as if the nays were more plentiful. Curiously, as some guests were scattered among the membership, it was impossible to tell if any of the guests had voted in the voice vote.  For example, although a visitor from Harrisonburg, I could have easily added my vote to the total and no one likely would have been the wiser.   Nevertheless, the chair ruled that they ayes had won and disregarded several protests from the audience.

What was even more surprising was that the temporary chairman then called for the meeting to be adjourned without any further business.  Many folks seemed stunned by the voice vote that followed, but the chair again declared that the ayes had carried the motion and thus the meeting was over only about 10 minutes or so after it had begun.  One exasperated member shouted about fascism.

Afterward, people shuffled out.  An older woman left while wiping tears from her eyes.  8 or so people, including Mark Berg, gathered in a circle for a prayer outside the room.

Inquiring into the matter further I talked with several of the members of the FCRC.  I was told that these new members were added to the committee so that one faction would now have sufficient numbers to purge the group of anyone deemed a troublemaker or those who did not support the new leadership.

I spoke with one woman who recorded the meeting and, if I am able to get a copy, will share it as well.

I have to say that although I’ve been going to political gatherings for 21 years now, I cannot recall a meeting so short, or one that was able to ram through their business in such an blatantly corrupt fashion.  One does wonder what sort of fallout will come to the Frederick County Republican Party and the Republican Party of Virginia for allowing these shenanigans to transpire.

The RPV Needs…

Graphic from bvbl.net
Graphic from bvbl.net

This morning, the Washington Post announced that Shaun Kenney, the executive director of the Republican Party of Virginia, is stepping down from his position.  Reactions from my fellow bloggers have been mixed with some praising Mr. Kenney’s efforts, a few questioning them, and others declaring that the extreme right wing has taken over the party.  As someone who has known Shaun for a number of years, I’m of the opinion that he is a good fellow; I’ve always enjoyed the opportunities I’ve had to speak with him and I certainly wish him well in his future endeavors.

But what’s going on with the Republican Party of Virginia?  According to fellow blogger Black Velvet Bruce Li, the party is in a dire financial situation.  Apparently, the net worth of the party has been in rapid decline in recent months and is now less than -$200,000.  Yes, you read that number correctly, negative two hundred thousand.  Certainly that could spell a lot of trouble for the party, no?  So what is the RPV planning to do about this issue?

Well, on Wednesday night as I arrived in downtown Staunton to meet with a fellow activist, I received a call from the Republican Party of Virginia.  The man on the other end of the phone noted that I had been a long-time supporter of the party and requested a donation of $350.  I could have simply said no, but instead I told him that although it is true that I had supported the party for many years, including working for the RPV, I had been expelled from my local party last year.  In addition, both before and after that time, I had gotten into several disagreements with my Representative, Bob Goodlatte, who I felt has not been doing a particularly good job representing either my values or the values of the RPV as stated in the creed.

The caller seemed a little disturbed, declaring that we ought to have the right to question our leaders when we think they go astray and that dialogue is an important aspect of the process.  I agreed and so he asked if I would “let bygones be bygones” and donate $250 to the party.

I responded by telling him more of my experiences, that in 2014 I ran as a candidate for local office.  Although I was arguably the most conservative or libertarian candidate and the only one who ever mentioned the RPV creed (to the best of my knowledge), I was maligned by the local GOP.  They did so because I was an independent and had the gall to run against the anointed party’s nominees.  Every elected Republican official representing Harrisonburg, including ones that I had volunteered countless hours for in previous elections, publicly opposed my candidacy, regardless of any supposed shared ideological mooring.  With those thoughts in mind, I asked him why in the world would I donate money to the Republican Party of Virgina?  At that point, he decided to terminate the phone call.

I should add that several weeks ago I appreciated the opportunity to speak with newly elected RPV chairman John Whitbeck.  Although I don’t think we reached any sort of resolution, I argued that the RPV ought to do a far better job of insisting its candidates and elected officials hold to some sort of ideological standard.  I still hope that they will.

Getting back to the original point, yes, signs seem to indicate that the RPV is in trouble financially.  But they shouldn’t ask me to help.  I’m happy to support good, individual candidates who believe as I do whether they run as Republicans, Democrats, Libertarians, independents, or something else.  However, until and unless the party and its leaders decides to actually adhere to anything approaching limited government principles, I assure you that they won’t be receiving support of any kind from me.  From my conversations with my fellow activists, more and more of us seem to be reaching this same conclusion.  Or, to put it another way, if they think we should support the Republican Party based merely upon nice sounding rhetoric and our past associations, to borrow a lyric from Judas Priest, “you’re mad.  You’ve got another thing comin'”.

The RPV needs money, yes, but far more importantly it needs principles.